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descentintotyranny:

Thomas Paine, Our Contemporary — Chris Hedges
May 25 2014

The power of Paine, as in the case of Orwell or Baldwin, was that he refused to be anyone’s propagandist. He may have embraced the American Revolution, as he embraced the French Revolution, but he was a fierce abolitionist and a foe of the use of terror as a political tool, a stance for which he was eventually imprisoned in revolutionary France. He asked the American revolutionaries “with what consistency, or decency” they “could complain so loudly of attempts to enslave them, while they hold so many hundred thousand in slavery.” He stood up in the National Convention in France, where he was one of two foreigners allowed to be elected and sit as a delegate, to denounce the calls in the chamber to execute the king, Louis XVI. “He that would make his own liberty secure must guard even his enemy from oppression,” Paine said. “For if he violates this duty he establishes a precedent that will reach to himself.” Unchecked legislatures, he warned, could be as despotic as unchecked monarchs. He hated the pomp and arrogance of power and privilege, retaining his loyalty to the working class in which he was raised. “High sounding names” like My Lord, he wrote, serve only to “overawe the superstitious vulgar” and make them “admire in the great, the vices they would honestly condemn in themselves.” He ridiculed the divine right of kings. The British monarchy, which traced itself back seven centuries to William the Conqueror, had, he wrote, been founded by “a French bastard landing with armed banditti and establishing himself king of England against the consent of the natives.” And he detested the superstition and power of religious dogma, equating Christian belief with Greek mythology. “All national institutions of churches, whether Jewish, Christian or Turkish, appear to me no other than human inventions, set up to terrify and enslave mankind, and monopolize power and profit,” he wrote. Paine posited that the “virtuous people” would smash the windows of the Christian God if he lived on earth. 
His unrelenting commitment to truth and justice, along with his eternal rebelliousness, saw him later vilified by the leaders of the new American republic, who had no interest in the egalitarian society championed by Paine. Paine attacked former revolutionaries such as George Washington in the United States and Maximilien Robespierre in France who abused power in the name of “the people.” He was driven out of England by the government of William Pitt and then, after nearly a year in prison, was ousted from Jacobin France. He was, by that time, an old man, and even his former champions, in well-orchestrated smear campaigns, routinely denounced him for his religious and political radicalism. The popular press in America dismissed him as “the drunken infidel.” But Paine never veered from the proposition that liberty meant the liberty to speak the truth even if no one wanted to hear it. He died, largely forgotten, a pauper in New York City. Six people went to his funeral. Two of them were black. 

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descentintotyranny:

Thomas Paine, Our Contemporary — Chris Hedges

May 25 2014

The power of Paine, as in the case of Orwell or Baldwin, was that he refused to be anyone’s propagandist. He may have embraced the American Revolution, as he embraced the French Revolution, but he was a fierce abolitionist and a foe of the use of terror as a political tool, a stance for which he was eventually imprisoned in revolutionary France. He asked the American revolutionaries “with what consistency, or decency” they “could complain so loudly of attempts to enslave them, while they hold so many hundred thousand in slavery.” He stood up in the National Convention in France, where he was one of two foreigners allowed to be elected and sit as a delegate, to denounce the calls in the chamber to execute the king, Louis XVI. “He that would make his own liberty secure must guard even his enemy from oppression,” Paine said. “For if he violates this duty he establishes a precedent that will reach to himself.” Unchecked legislatures, he warned, could be as despotic as unchecked monarchs. He hated the pomp and arrogance of power and privilege, retaining his loyalty to the working class in which he was raised. “High sounding names” like My Lord, he wrote, serve only to “overawe the superstitious vulgar” and make them “admire in the great, the vices they would honestly condemn in themselves.” He ridiculed the divine right of kings. The British monarchy, which traced itself back seven centuries to William the Conqueror, had, he wrote, been founded by “a French bastard landing with armed banditti and establishing himself king of England against the consent of the natives.” And he detested the superstition and power of religious dogma, equating Christian belief with Greek mythology. “All national institutions of churches, whether Jewish, Christian or Turkish, appear to me no other than human inventions, set up to terrify and enslave mankind, and monopolize power and profit,” he wrote. Paine posited that the “virtuous people” would smash the windows of the Christian God if he lived on earth. 

His unrelenting commitment to truth and justice, along with his eternal rebelliousness, saw him later vilified by the leaders of the new American republic, who had no interest in the egalitarian society championed by Paine. Paine attacked former revolutionaries such as George Washington in the United States and Maximilien Robespierre in France who abused power in the name of “the people.” He was driven out of England by the government of William Pitt and then, after nearly a year in prison, was ousted from Jacobin France. He was, by that time, an old man, and even his former champions, in well-orchestrated smear campaigns, routinely denounced him for his religious and political radicalism. The popular press in America dismissed him as “the drunken infidel.” But Paine never veered from the proposition that liberty meant the liberty to speak the truth even if no one wanted to hear it. He died, largely forgotten, a pauper in New York City. Six people went to his funeral. Two of them were black. 

Read More

— 1 hour ago with 166 notes
ofthaveimused:

General George Washington and Aide-de-Camp Alexander Hamilton
Revolutionary War

ofthaveimused:

General George Washington and Aide-de-Camp Alexander Hamilton

Revolutionary War

— 3 hours ago with 220 notes
minutemanworld:

Washington Crossing the Delaware for our times? 
(I never thought I’d be using the tags George Washington and Darth Vader together.)

minutemanworld:

Washington Crossing the Delaware for our times? 

(I never thought I’d be using the tags George Washington and Darth Vader together.)

— 5 hours ago with 353 notes
dazedclarity:

Guys I don’t think we talk about James Armistead Lafayette enough. Like seriously this guy deserves all the awards and I can’t believe a movie hasn’t been made about him. 
This guy, at age 21, got permission to leave his master’s plantation to join the Continental Army and fight in the American Revolution. The Marquis de Lafayette was impressed by his memory, so he sent him to spy on the camps of Benedict Arnold and General Cornwallis. He joined the British posing as a simple servant. He used the white generals’ racism against them, because they never noticed nor thought about the black server standing near when they worked out plans. 
Turns out, he was so damn good at his job that the British asked him to spy on the Americans. He became a double agent, giving the British fake information and Lafayette real information. Not just any information, mind you, but information that was vital to the victory at Yorktown. Only Armistead, of all the spies that were sent to Cornwallis, was able to get it. And through it all, ol’ Corny didn’t have a clue until he entered the revolutionaries’ headquarters only to see him standing next to Lafayette like the badass he was.
Unfortunately, because Virginia can be a load of dicks sometimes, after the war he was sent right back in to slavery. The Act of 1783 that freed slave soldiers was deemed not to apply to him because he was a spy. Well, when Lafayette heard of that, he had a very appropriate reaction of “What the actual hell, Virginia?” and sent a testimonial to the Virginia legislature in support of Armistead’s emancipation. By 1787, James Armistead was free, and changed his name to James Lafayette out of gratitude. 
This story has a happy ending, at least, because Armistead Lafayette got to spend the rest of his life living peacefully on a farm with his family, eventually complete with a $40 pension for his services. 

dazedclarity:

Guys I don’t think we talk about James Armistead Lafayette enough. Like seriously this guy deserves all the awards and I can’t believe a movie hasn’t been made about him. 

This guy, at age 21, got permission to leave his master’s plantation to join the Continental Army and fight in the American Revolution. The Marquis de Lafayette was impressed by his memory, so he sent him to spy on the camps of Benedict Arnold and General Cornwallis. He joined the British posing as a simple servant. He used the white generals’ racism against them, because they never noticed nor thought about the black server standing near when they worked out plans. 

Turns out, he was so damn good at his job that the British asked him to spy on the Americans. He became a double agent, giving the British fake information and Lafayette real information. Not just any information, mind you, but information that was vital to the victory at Yorktown. Only Armistead, of all the spies that were sent to Cornwallis, was able to get it. And through it all, ol’ Corny didn’t have a clue until he entered the revolutionaries’ headquarters only to see him standing next to Lafayette like the badass he was.

Unfortunately, because Virginia can be a load of dicks sometimes, after the war he was sent right back in to slavery. The Act of 1783 that freed slave soldiers was deemed not to apply to him because he was a spy. Well, when Lafayette heard of that, he had a very appropriate reaction of “What the actual hell, Virginia?” and sent a testimonial to the Virginia legislature in support of Armistead’s emancipation. By 1787, James Armistead was free, and changed his name to James Lafayette out of gratitude. 

This story has a happy ending, at least, because Armistead Lafayette got to spend the rest of his life living peacefully on a farm with his family, eventually complete with a $40 pension for his services. 

— 8 hours ago with 258 notes

dehron:

Showcase: Craig Mullins (http://www.goodbrush.com/)

Period concept art

— 10 hours ago with 435 notes

oupacademic:

The American Revolution

In celebration of America’s founding, we trace the nation’s Revolutionary War from its beginning, on the Lexington Green to its end, agreed upon in the Treaty of Paris. Our authors revisit the battlefields at Trenton, Saratoga, Yorktown, and elsewhere, surveying military turning points and colonial-era politics, to provide a sweeping study of the birth of America.

What would you add to the list?

  • Thomas Paine and the Promise of America by Harvey J. Kaye
  • Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow
  • American Spring by Walter R. Borneman
— 12 hours ago with 263 notes
minutemanworld:

The “real” George Washington. This is a life-sized depiction of what George Washington may have looked like at age 19 when he was working as a surveyor. It’s based on what we know of his height, and weight at the time, and the facial reconstruction is done based on a life-mask done in 1785. 

minutemanworld:

The “real” George Washington. This is a life-sized depiction of what George Washington may have looked like at age 19 when he was working as a surveyor. It’s based on what we know of his height, and weight at the time, and the facial reconstruction is done based on a life-mask done in 1785. 

(Source: themorgan.org)

— 14 hours ago with 764 notes

sherylderoos:

Show no emotions. Feel no pain.

— 19 hours ago with 453 notes

The only reason you think the south is the “racist” part of the US is because everywhere else niggas don’t make up a big enough percentage of the population to get heard like that.

— 19 hours ago

icedteaintheafternoon:

kenway:

uzujusttoodamnfresh:

tiny-green-box:

kenway:

the southern US genuinely scares me like my map of ‘states i will willingly go to for college’ looks more or less like

image

if you’re coming to the us this is a good travel guide fyi <3

thats pretty ignorant tbh 

so are the racist and prejudiced people who live in those areas

Just don’t come to the US tbh. There are more hate groups in California than there are in Texas!

Avoiding the south ain’t gonna save you

— 19 hours ago with 22279 notes